Category: How-To's Archives - Root Level Technology

Clair Image Scan Setup in a Codefresh Pipeline

Clair image scanning provides a report on known vulnerabilities in a docker image. Adding this to your Codefresh CI/CD pipeline means you can view threats and start automating your responses to them. This can be as simple as showing a report with the listed vulnerabilities to the development team, to something as complex as rolling back deployment to the last approved build if the vulnerabilities exceed your desired guidelines.   In order to use the Clair Scan you must have your own Clair Scan service setup ahead of time. You can then pass the docker image to your Clair Scan service during your CodeFresh Pipeline Setup. The report will need to be saved in a storage bucket and a link […]

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Turn on your Predictive Scaling for EC2 now!

If you have an autoscaling group in AWS, you have a need for Predictive Scaling. Predictive Scaling is exactly what it sounds like: Machine Learning being applied to your auto scaling metrics through a service provided by Amazon. This service looks at metrics provided from your existing Auto-Scaling group metrics including CPU use or custom-defined metrics. These metrics are weighed against Amazon’s own data to build a forecast for resource usage by your EC2 instances. The more data points available for machine learning, the better your results. AWS’s predictive scaling only requires 24 hours of data to start making predictions, but those predictions will get better the more data is available. Predictive Scaling is a free service and can be […]

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Creating a Private Hybrid Kubernetes Cluster Pt. 2

To pick up where I left off in the previous post, I had just finished attempting to create a cluster using Windows Server 1709 and 1607. In each of these I was able to get the cluster created, but there were still some issues that prevented the cluster from being usable with Windows workloads (e.g., Windows containers wouldn’t start, meaning that the cluster was no better than a Linux-only cluster).   Then, I acquired the most recent 1803 Windows Server. I went back and re-tried it using Rancher.   After a couple of minor hiccups (getting Docker installed and running was a bit more difficult than expected: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/virtualization/Windowscontainers/quick-start/quick-start-Windows-server https://blog.docker.com/2016/09/build-your-first-docker-Windows-server-container/), I saw a curious error when first attempting to join the […]

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